Tag Archives: Spirituality

Money and Fame

We’ve been conditioned to believe that ‘winner takes all’ and ‘if I have money/fame, THEN I’ll be secure, I’ll have friends/be popular, have meaning and feel accomplishment in my life’.

 

This video leaves with a question at the end.  I would add an additional question:

What do I have in abundance?

Often we don’t see our own abilities as worthwhile/abundant because they’re not reflected back as valued in society.  As we wrestle with personal values and the simple things that sustain us – quietly sharing the things we DO have in abundance – the result is joy.  Appreciating what we have begins by not judging ourselves that we aren’t rich/famous/thin/successful enough.  At first our personal abundance may look silly or useless, but sit with the tiny simplicity of it, and it may take on a life of its own, crafting a way to bring joy not just to us but to others.

Here’s an example of a simple abundance from my own life.

Our house breeds clothes.  When the kids were small  I set up a clothes and stuff swap for entertainment in our home.  We moved what we wanted to other rooms, and set up marked areas with signage so guests would know where to place their unwanted things for swapping.

It was hoot! Fun was had by all as friends and family brought over things they didn’t need and we socialized and swapped. The kids pretty much stayed in the toy room and found new toys to take home, the parents socialized and found things we needed, I was able to clear out clutter we didn’t need anymore and found things we could use.  I found a creative and socially fun use for my abundance.  It brought me joy.

My abundance (clothes and stuff that seems to breed in the attic) wasn’t money, or fame, or power.  It was ‘just’ clothes and stuff.  It was something simple. I started looking for ways to be creative with what I saw as my abundance.

To make a long story short, after years of experimenting I created Swap Positive– started with the simple abundance of extra clothes.

Sharing abundance gives joy.

What do you have extra in your life?  What do you have a lot of?  What is your abundance? Are you someone who can’t wipe the smile off your face?  Do you have way too many empty toilet paper tubes?  Do you get a thrill from constantly holding babies?  If you give away your extra, what kind of joy will you bring to yourself and to others? If you smile at people it could make a positive difference in their day.  Maybe a local preschool would love those toilet paper tubes for the ongoing projects they have, and appreciate your steady supply?  A hospital might need someone to hold premie newborns, or a church/school/clinic nursery might appreciate your skills so young mothers can get a short refreshing breather. What you see as ‘not really anything’, or maybe even feel guilty about, might be what you have in abundance.  Realizing and using your abundance creatively could make all the difference in how you see yourself and your place in this world.  Being rich, famous, and powerful doesn’t bring joy, but maybe having too many toilet paper tubes or egg cartons might be the beginning of a new chapter of joy and giving in your life?

Barb

Honoring Tomb-time

With Easter and stories of new life and resurrection on our minds, I wanted to explore a side of Easter that I’ve never heard discussed before.

I saw a comment on facebook from a friend of mine that said:

“Sick. Depressed. More than I can handle”.

Without having context to that comment, it got me to thinking.  How many of us have felt that way at one time or another? It sucks. Sometimes life gets sucked out and so it just sucks. Lack of health sucks. Trying to keep a smile on sucks. Having a person/pet you love die sucks. Getting out of bed sucks. Watching people just not ‘get it’ sucks. Not being able to do anything about it sucks. Not having energy sucks. About the only things that don’t suck at times might include:

1. the love and kindness of a spouse who cares/close family who will listen and not judge

2. soft organic flannel sheets

3. Hyberbole and a half dark humor

I wonder if sometimes ‘hitting bottom’ might possibly be compared to a place like Christ in the tomb: cold, dark, quiet, a suspended life. And that’s OK. It’s OK to be buried for awhile. In fact, maybe that’s part of the Easter Story? Maybe instead of rushing to the resurrection, maybe it’s OK to be in the tomb? Maybe it’s not a ‘fault’ to be in the tomb? Maybe it’s just part of a – can I say it – healthy life to be in the tomb?  Even if we don’t know how long it will last?  Especially if we don’t know how long it will last?

Yes, resurrection does come, and we celebrate that, but maybe there is also a place to respect the times in our lives that represent tombs?  Why do we fear the cold, dark, quiet, suspended times?  Is it because in American culture those are seen as ‘weak’, or ‘useless’, or ‘bad’, or ‘unproductive’…and we feel shamed for them?  What would happen if those times of depression/grief, or “tomb-time”, had a different, purposeful meaning in our culture?  Do other cultures have a place of respect for those times in a person’s life?

How can we incorporate a safe, honorable, and healthy place for those -including ourselves – who are experiencing tomb-time?  If we had a different perspective, maybe we wouldn’t feel the cultural need to deny, try to cheer-lead it away, or shame it?  Maybe tomb-time is an important part of a healthy life?

Some possible resources: the book Tear Soup , online helps from Tear Soup.

Barb

Good News Network gets a fantastic make-over

The Good News Network was started by Geri Weis-Corbley in 1997, and I’ve enjoyed the little encouraging stories sent to my email inbox for many years.  Recently the Good News Network went through a transformation, and is now a free and easily navigated news service. The insight and direction of Geri’s work and attitude are cutting edge cultural creative.  Check out more information about what she’s doing, why, the history, how you can get involved by sending in your own stories, and more here.  Now you can start and end your day with GOOD news from the Good News Network  – rated #1 on Google.

Book: Journey of Souls: Case Studies Of Life Between Lives

journeyofsoulsWhether religious or not, this is a fascinating look into an unexplored possibility of what happens after death. I enjoyed the example of the creator/source being an active and living presence in our lives – here and in the hereafter- as opposed to the current working definition that tends to separate the creator as the big judge outside that has created a hierarchy of painful separation through rules, rewards, and punishments.

Author Michael Newton PH.D has a background as a counseling psychologist, master hypnotherapist, teacher, and researcher. This book covers such topics as How it feels to die, What you see and feel right after death, When and where you learn to recognize soul mates on earth, Different levels of souls- beginning/intermediate/and advanced, What happens to “disturbed” souls, and The purpose of life and manifestation of a Creator.

If you’re able and willing to stretch your mind and imagination, enjoy this fresh look at the age old idea of ‘what happens after we die?’.

Are Bronies changing the face of masculinity?

Are the qualities of friendship, fun, working together, inclusiveness, and kindness ONLY male traits; female traits; or are they human traits?

These hero’s are making the world a happier, kinder, more inclusive place; creating 3D men (instead of men chained in a 2D world box of destruction, disfunction, and distance).

The freedom of age

Women talking about what they love about their age and how they see themselves grow and thrive.  No matter what your age, from 4 to 93, here’s how to love your age.

Book: Choosing Easy World

photo 1You know all those books that tell you “just have a positive mental attitude?”  Well, this book is the manual on how to achieve that effortlessly.   Read this mix of practical examples, storytelling, science, and you can be in easy world as well.   If you believe there could be parallel universes or realities…why not parallel worlds of difficult and easy?  This book gives tools to actively (or at times quite passively) change your perspective to make joy your main operating source instead of fear/control/worry.

 

Julia Rogers Hamrick’s writing style makes this book a fast read.  I can see how many of the good things that have happened to me, the “wow, I can’t believe my luck!” experiences, took place when I was in what this book refers to as ‘Easy World’.  It’s the world of flow, of connection, of joy and fun and hard work that ends in satisfaction.  This Easy World perspective isn’t a striving place or a place of pushing, worry, stress, etc.    And it’s not a pill you take once and everything is peachy.  It’s a place to live.  Take a journey through Choosing Easy World by Julia Rogers Hamrick, and see if your perspective changes for the better.