Tag Archives: Clean water

Water-producing billboard

The city of Lima Peru doesn’t get much rainfall, but they can get humidity as high as 98%.  The University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC) has partnered with advertising agency Mayo-Draft FCB to create a novel way for residents to not only get unpolluted drinking water (their local wells are often polluted), but also to show prospective students that they could make the world a better place by becoming an engineer. The billboard catches humidity in the air and turns it into filtered drinking water, and is capable of producing 96 liters (over 25 gallons) of water every day for the locals or travelers needing a drink.  This video outlines the project:

Thanks to Gizmag for this story.

Smog-eating concrete and other new tech ideas

America’s Greenest Street’ provides a complete street urban development package.  I’ve heard of permeable pavers, bioswales to absorb rainwater overflow, recycled concrete, and tree canopies to produce shade in the summer and absorb traffic pollution.  But I hadn’t heard of Smog-Eating concrete, nor LED street lights run on solar AND wind power combined.  The lights are actually quite fun to watch when the wind blows.

Here’s a short video of these and other new inventions that could power our cities in practical and beautiful ways:

See the whole article by gizmag here.

A living sewage treatment plant

Here’s a really cool technique for treating wastewater that treats up to 52,000 gallons of human waste a day, and produces clean water, fertilizer for food, and solar energy in the process.  Makes me want to go on a retreat to the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies just to try it out (well, and take a rest, do yoga, get massages, learn stuff – basically my ideal retreat).  This is yet another creative example of cradle-to-cradle technology, where one being’s waste is another’s food.  This is a larger scale and power supplying version of my previous articles on home-use composting toilets and home use herb garden/worm bin/fish tank.  This is also a practical solution to update our current faulty national sanitation system.  Thanks to Yes! magazine for the link.

Composting toilet as a sustainable option for the cabin, boat, or basement

I’m intrigued by the whole idea of cradle-to-cradle technology. From what I’ve read, it wasn’t that long ago when some cultures requested you to give a return on their food/hospitality investment before you left (ie you leave your waste product for use as fertilizer for their crops).   I’ve always thought it odd to put waste into our fresh drinking water, and then use chemicals and processing to take it back out again.  However, in our culture, composting is thought to be inconvenient, smelly, and beneath our sensibilities.

Well, with new technology, modern composting toilets are easily available online – and I even saw a composting toilet in a local plumbing showroom!  Some Continue reading

Cook a turkey in a solar oven

Who would have thought you could cook a turkey in a solar oven?  My how solar ovens have improved.  It wasn’t that long ago when the only solar ovens were the ones you made at home with a pizza box and tin foil.  Then, websites became available to donate solar ovens to people in countries with not much firewood, or who had trouble affording gas/oil/etc. for cooking.  Now, people in first world as well as third world countries can purchase and use solar ovens to bake, boil, and steam food, enhancing taste and benefitting Continue reading

Vegetable/herb garden, worm bin, and fish tank all rolled into one

Wouldn’t it be great to have a vegetable/herb garden, worm bin, and fish tank all rolled into one?  Such an invention already exists, and the easy at-home version is called a Fishy Farm.  I like the littler version for a fun take on indoor gardening with fish tank aquarium, but in the bigger outdoor version you can grow rainbow trout or tilapia for consumption as well.  The fish wastewater is piped up to the veggies/herbs to be used as fertilizer.  No soil is used, only clay type balls and volcanic rock, and around those balls are red worms that eat anything that the plants don’t use.  The water then drains Continue reading

Book Review: The Hidden Messages In Water

If you’re looking for a short and fascinating read, check out The Hidden Messages in Water, by Masaru Emoto.

The Hidden Messages in Water introduces the revolutionary work of internationally renowned Japanese scientist Masaru Emoto, who has discovered that molecules of water are affected by our thoughts, words, and feelings.

The photos in the book are incredible.  Emoto took samples of waters from around the world, and in a lab the only thing different he did was to expose them to the vibrations of various music styles, or to the vibration of certain Continue reading